(Other Events

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

 (Presenter Bios)
9:00 − 4:30 pm Pre-Conference Institutes
(Hotel Map)
4:00 − 8:00 pm On-Site Conference Registration and Distribution of Materials Santa Rosa
5:00 − 7:30 pm Conference Reception (Optional)
Reception Fully Funded by:  
San Manuel Band of Mission Indians
Casey Family Programs
(No federal funds utilized)

Emcee
Elton Naswood (Navajo)
Capacity Building Division
Office of Minority Health Resource Center

Generational Voices Uniting for Healing
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida-Iroquois)
Grammy Award Winning Singer/Performer/Composer/ Actress/Lecturer
Former Co-Chair, Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence
East Pool Deck
(Weather Permitting)

Thursday, December 8, 2016

 
7:00 − 9:00 am On-Site Conference Registration and Distribution of Materials Santa Rosa
9:00 − Noon Plenary Opening Session California Ballroom
  Emcees
Sarah Deer (Mvskoke), Professor
Mitchell Hamline School of Law
MacArthur Fellow, 2014

Kelly Stoner (Cherokee), Victim Advocacy Legal Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
 
  Opening Invocation
Ernest Siva (Serrano/Cahuilla)
 
  Honoring the Wisdom of Our Warriors that Protect Our Safety
Flag/Honor Song
The Boyz
 
  Posting of Colors
First Nations Women Warriors Color Guard
 
  Cultural Ceremony (Chair Ceremony)
Honoring Ceremony for Victims/Survivors of Violence
Jim Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
  BREAK (Break food fully funded by Casey Family Programs, federal funds limited to beverages only)  
  Opening Remarks
Joye E. Frost
Director
Office for Victims of Crime
Office of Justice Programs
U.S. Department of Justice

Tammie Gregg
Deputy Associate Attorney General
Office of Associate Attorney General
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Opening Keynote Presentations
Making Indian Country Victimization Issues a Priority for the New Administration
Video
We are a Horse Nation
 
  Panel of Wisdom Keepers: Healing for Victims through Cultural Traditions
Moderator
Bonnie Clairmont (Ho-Chunk)
Victim Advocacy Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute

Thomas Smittle (Shoshone/Navajo descent)
Executive Director
Red Horse Nation

Arvol Looking Horse (Cheyenne River Sioux)
Chief, Spiritual Leader
Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe

Ethleen Two Dogs (Oglala Sioux)
Special Programs Coordinator
Indian Country Child Trauma Center
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
 
     
Noon − 1:30 pm LUNCH (On your own)  
1:30 − 3:00 pm Workshops A  

Lonna Hunter
Carolyn Bryant

Tools and Strategies for Pursuing and Advancing Victim Rights
This workshop will provide information on resources and strategies available at the tribal, federal, state, and local level to assist tribal communities in addressing barriers to accessing victim rights and resources. Participants will gain practical knowledge that can be adapted to meet the needs of their community and partners.

A1 
Chino

Melina Healey
Claudia Angelos 
Building an Effective Tribal Sex Trafficking Code
Sex trafficking of Native people in the United States is as old as the first European contact with the “new world” and persists widely to this day. Unfortunately, tribal, state, and federal legislative, law enforcement, and judicial action are inadequate at the task of prevention and redress of sex trafficking of Native people, who are particularly vulnerable on reservations. Challenges include endemic poverty, child abuse, substance abuse, and lack of services, as well as oil drilling that incubates new markets for commercial sexual exploitation, and the "jurisdictional maze" complicates criminal justice responses to the crime. This workshop will explore how to address these challenges and build an effective tribal anti-trafficking law within a broader strategy to combat trafficking on reservations.
A2 
Pueblo

Kim Day
Leslie A. Hagen
Jennifer Pierce Weeks
Examination Options after Sexual Assault: Do Survivors Have to Report?
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women, Indian Health Service and U.S. Department of Justice)
Access to healthcare after sexual assault can be critical to survivors beginning the healing process and to prevent long term health consequences. Reporting the assault to law enforcement should not be a barrier to accessing this care. Providing exams with options for reporting is a requirement under VAWA 2005. Practical implementation of these options when working with multiple jurisdictions can be difficult without collaboration between community responders.
A3
Mohave
Learning Center
Jenell Navarro
Tracy Bear
Sarah Deer
Laura Harjo
Kimberly Robertson
Community-Centered Efforts to Address Violence against Indigenous Women and Girls
Violence against Native women is far too common. Since many survivors don’t engage with the criminal justice system, communities are implementing their own forms of protection and healing. This workshop highlights the art installation called Walking With Our Sisters as one way to respond to gendered violence against our sisters.
A4
Catalina
Dianne Barker-Harrold
Jesucita Hernandez 
Compassion Fatigue and Stress Relief for Service Providers in Indian Country
This workshop is to provide information related to trauma, compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma and stress relief, cultural and no cost, high cost, and low cost stress relief activities and self-tests and life stress tests.
A5
Madera
Erik Stegman
Amber Nicole Richardson
Building Platforms for Native Youth to Prevent Violence and Promote Healing
(Sponsored by the Center for Native American Youth and Office for Victims of Crime)
American Indian and Alaska Native children suffer exposure to violence at rates higher than any other race in the US. Learn how the Center for Native American Youth elevates Native youth perspectives of violence and victimization and highlights Native youth-led efforts to prevent violence and promote healing in tribal and urban Indian communities.
A6
Pasadena

Lenny Hayes Sexual Violence Against Men and Boys: The Impact
Often men are the neglected victims of all forms of sexual violence including being abused as a boy. It is frightening to realize how widespread sexual abuse and violence is in our society and yet how strong the denial of it is. The presenter will discuss the impact of sexual abuse and violence against men as adults and as a child. The presenter will discuss the mental health issues as well as define the issues that prevent the individual from having healthy relationships.
A7
Sierra/
Ventura
Christine Crossland
Steven Hafner 
Tribal Investigator Development Program - Listening Session
(Sponsored by National Institute of Justice) (Listening Session Invitation LetterListening Session Information)
In this listening session, feedback will be solicited on the possible creation of a program that would enhance capacity for rigorous and culturally appropriate research and evaluation in tribal communities. Specifically, insights on the need for and structure of a tribal investigator development program will be gathered.
A8
Smoke Tree 
D/E
Devin Rieckmann-Sell
Lea Geurts
C. Kirk Johnson
Juli Ana Grant
A Comprehensive Approach to Sex Offender Management: The Importance of Victim-Centeredness
(Sponsored by SMART Office)
This session will assist participants in gaining a better understanding of the role of victim-centeredness in sex offender management focusing on: the impacts of sexual victimization, multi-disciplinary approaches to developing and providing system support services for victims, families, and community using existing tribal resources. Additionally, this workshop will review reentry  concepts for convicted sex offenders into Tribal communities including the role of tribal probation and victim service programs. Workshop facilitators will review programs that work with victims services to provide input for reentry programs.
A9
Smoke Tree 
C
Marilyn Roberts
Allison Turkel
State VOCA Administrators and Tribal Victim Services: Working Together to Ensure Better Outcomes for AI/AN Victims of Crime
Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) invites tribal meeting participants to gather with state Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) Administrators to: 1) provide introductions; 2) discuss any questions related to victim’s assistance and compensation; and 3) discuss gaps and trends.
A10
Smoke Tree
A/B
Brett Shelton
Cheryl D. Fairbanks
David Raasch
Michael Petosky
Senior Tribal Court Judges Circle: Innovative Uses of Traditions and Values
(Sponsored by Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Tribal Court, Bureau of Justice Assistance and Office for Victims of Crime)
Senior Tribal Court Judges discuss how employing tribal traditions, values, and peacemaking processes from the bench and other contexts can change behavior rather than merely punish. Changing behavior is the greatest protection of the safety of vulnerable members of our communities, and allows victims to heal and live without fear.
A11
Mesquite 
G/H
Diane Bohn

Sexual and Domestic Violence: Creating a Comprehensive, Reservation-wide Response (Sponsored by Indian Health Service)
This presentation will include viewing Nigaadaazhaadaamin (We Need to Talk About It), a 25-minute video created on the Leech Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota. The video takes a candid look at the issue of domestic violence in local tribal communities. The voice of a survivor is mingled amongst interviews with law enforcement and mental health providers. Excerpts are included of elders discussing violence against women at Gaynahchiwanig (all the people coming together in a sacred manner). The Director and SANE/SARRT Coordinator of the comprehensive Indian Health Service-based Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative (SADVPI) on the Leech Lake Reservation will facilitate discussion.
A12
Mesquite
E/F
3:00 − 3:30 pm BREAK (Break fully funded by Casey Family Programs and San Manual Band of Mission Indians, no federal fund utilized)
 
3:30 − 5:00 pm Workshops B  
Heather Hoechst
John Molina
Nikole Nelson
Medical-Legal Partnerships: Promoting Health and Justice in Tribal Communities
(Sponsored by Kresge Foundation and Office for Victims of Crime)
Medical-Legal Partnerships (MLPs) integrate civil legal services into hospitals and health centers to address the social determinants of health. MLPs on the Navajo Nation have achieved justice and secured health-promoting resources for vulnerable patients, including crime victims. The MLP model is now expanding throughout Indian country, including Alaska Native communities.
B1 
Chino
Victoria Ybanez
Cinnamon Ronneng
Reclaiming What is Sacred: Addressing Harm to Indigenous Elders and Developing a Tribal Response to Abuse in Later Life
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women and Office for Victims of Crime)
This session will examine abuse in later life from an indigenous perspective. The National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life developed a new document that examines the tribal response to elder abuse. This session will cover key aspects of that document and will talk about tribal belief systems that honor elders and the current challenges tribes face in developing a response. Participants will gain an understanding of historical trauma and grief and how it plays a role when elders are being abused. In addition, participants will examine how elder abuse might have different dynamics and ways the abuse may take place. Time will be taken to discuss the critical questions tribes will grapple with as they develop their response and put in place additional safety supports to help protect and intervene in the lives of elders being abuse.
B2 
Pueblo
Jim Warren
Paul Fuentes
Chris Lobanov-Rostvsky
Marnie Dollinger
Victim Centered Approaches to Sex Offender Management: Community Education and Notification
(Sponsored by SMART Office)
This workshop will outline key considerations in public notification and protecting victims. Participants will be able to describe the information required for notification, and when website notification is required. Additionally, participants will be able to identify effective key steps and strategies for conducting effective public education meetings and how this connects to community sexual violence prevention.
B3
Mohave
Learning Center
Kelly Stoner Developing a Domestic Violence Court/Docket
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women)
This workshop will educate tribes on how to develop and implement a Tribal Domestic Violence Court/Docket. The workshop will discuss the need for domestic violence training for all systems and services interfacing with victims. It will also discuss the importance of collaboration and coordination of the systems in order to promote safety of victims and batterer accountability.
B4
Catalina
Dianne Barker-Harrold
Gayle Thom
Cultural Debriefing for Service Providers: Mass Victimization, Critical Incidents, and Crisis Response
This workshop will provide discussions related to cultural debriefing for service providers in Indian country who are impacted by serving mass victimization, critical incidents, and post-traumatic stress disorders. Types of traumatic events in Indian country and modules for cultural debriefing will be discussed. Participants will learn the phases of crisis and crisis characteristics.
B5
Madera
Michele Maas Sweetgrass Grows: Integrating Traditional and Western Methods of Healing for Work with Victims of Crime Coping with Trauma
This workshop provides a safe place for participants to enhance their knowledge/skills for work with individuals who have experienced direct or vicarious trauma. The presenter will provide an overview of how trauma affects the mind, body and spirit highlighting skills that are developed or missing due to trauma exposure. Participants will have the opportunity to learn strategies for coping with trauma triggers and methods of integrating cultural wellness into healing.
B6
Pasadena
Shawn Soulsby
Hallie Bongar White
Two-Spirit/LGBTQI Victims of Sexual Violence in Indian Country
This workshop will open the discussion about the roles of two-spirit/Native lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgender, queer and intersex (LGBTQI) and the issues that they face in the Native community. This information is designed to help tribal communities provide culturally and traditionally based responses to the needs of Native LGBTQI.
B7
Sierra/
Ventura
Christine Crossland
Steven Hafner
Developing an Alternative Evaluation System for Culture-Based Programs and Practices – Listening Session (Alternative Evaluation Listening Session Information)
(Sponsored by National Institute of Justice)
This session will discuss the potential development of a system to evaluate or rate culture-based programs and practices being used in tribal communities. The current evaluation system will be presented and feedback will be solicited to understand better the role of key stakeholders, system format and function, and evaluation criteria.
B8
Smoke Tree 
D/E
Arlana Bettelyoun
Tate Win Means
Lawrence Swalley
Caretakers of the Children – Comprehensive Child Advocacy
Oglala Lakota Children's Justice Center will showcase and share, "Caretakers of the Children," a culturally relevant approach to providing comprehensive advocacy to child abuse victims, which includes social justice and healing from trauma. A video demonstration will be presented.
B9
Smoke Tree
C
Kim Day
Jennifer Pierce Weeks
The Health Impacts of Strangulation: What all Responders Need to Know
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women, Indian Health Service and International Association of Forensic Nurses)
Strangulation injury can occur in the context of child abuse, domestic violence and sexual assault. It can be a life threatening event for the victim. Recognizing this should impact the way that responders interact with victims, including the questions they ask, and assuring they are given access to medical care. This workshop will outline the medical implications of strangulation and new recommended medical guidelines in strangulation.
B10
Smoke Tree
A/B
Mirtha R. Beadle  Development of a Tribal Action Plan: Promoting Holistic Healing
(Sponsored by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)
The Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010 (TLOA) promotes collaboration between federal agencies and tribes to address alcohol and substance abuse prevention, treatment, justice, safety, education, and youth issues within Indian country. This interactive presentation will illustrates action steps in the development of TAPs to support holistic healing.
B11
Mesquite 
G/H
 Leslie A. Hagen Using Stories as A Training Tool
Successful resolution of violent crime issues in Indian country frequently requires a multijurisdictional response. Thus, best practice is to have federal, state, and tribal criminal justice and social service personnel train together. This allows each jurisdiction to understand and appreciate the role, goals, and legal limits of their counterparts. One successful training method to bridge the cultural and professional differences inherent in a multijurisdictional response is to use stories or case studies. OVC, OVW and the National Indian Country Training Initiative have worked together to develop training tools focused on the tribal and federal response to domestic violence and sexual assault in tribal communities. This session will address training techniques and feature recently developed training DVDs on domestic violence and sexual assault committed in AI/AN communities. 
B12
Mesquite
E/F
7:00 − 9:00 pm Conference Working Dinner
(Fully funded by conference registration fees)
California Ballroom
  Emcee
Bonnie Clairmont (HoChunk)
Victim Advocacy Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
 
  Invocation
James Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
  Strengthening the Circle of Healing through Alaska Native Music
Byron Nicholai (Yup’ik)
Youth, Performer
Toksook Bay, Alaska
 
  Heroes Among Us: Celebrating our Success Stories
Sarah Deer (Mvskoke)
Professor
Mitchell Hamline School of Law
MacArthur Fellow, 2014
 
  Strengthening the Circle of Healing through Traditional Singing
Featuring the Chumash Inter-Tribal Singers
 

Friday, December 9, 2016

 
8:30 − 10:00 am Workshops C  
Eugenia Tyner-Dawson
Andrea Czajkowski
An Update from the Coordinating Committee on Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse
(Sponsored by U.S. Department of Justice, Department of the Interior, and Health and Human Services Department)
This workshop will consist of a presentation and audience dialogue with the federal interagency representatives to discuss the 5-year progress made on the Tribal Law and Order Act - Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse Memorandum of Agreement activities and funding for U.S. Department of Justice, Department of the Interior, and Health and Human Services Department.
C1 
Chino
David Rogers Victim Safety Centered Probation
(Sponsored by Tribal Public Safety Innovations)
Probation is often a confusing and misunderstood element of the justice system. It has been evolving at a rapid pace over the past several decades. The focus was on the offender and not the victim. This workshop will explore concepts of victim based probation.
C2 
Pueblo
Leon Ghahate
Brooke Powskey
Tribal Juvenile Diversion Program: A Collaborative Effort in Helping Juvenile Offenders, Victims and their Families
(Sponsored by Hualapai Juvenile Prosecutors Office)
The purpose of this workshop is to inform participants concerning an alternative to incarceration program (juvenile diversion) and how they cannot succeed in helping tribal communities without intense collaborative effort among all tribal programs. Once established, diversion programs move on to begin to help "special cases", which are juveniles who may be at severe risk such as sexual assault victims and offenders.
C3
Mohave
Learning Center
Diana Webster
Sarah Deer
Liz Murphy
The Link Between Domestic Violence and Animal Abuse in Indian Country
In this presentation, the speakers will address the link between violence against people and the connection to violence against animals within Indian country. The speakers will address colonization and its effects on the treatment of animals, and the current status of animals within tribal communities. The speakers will also discuss recent survey results that were gathered from numerous tribal communities about animal abuse.
C4
Catalina
Kim Day
Jennifer Pierce Weeks
Caring for Child Victims of Sexual Violence: A National Protocol - Making a Pediatric Response to Sexual Abuse Work in Tribal Communities
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women, Indian Health Service and International Association of Forensic Nurses)
Sexual violence can impact the health, well-being of the victim, the family and the community as a whole. When a child is the victim, it can be devastating to everyone. Having a compassionate, multi-disciplinary, child centered response and program to child sexual assault can be a critical first step to promote safety and healing for the child, family and community. The medical forensic examination is an integral piece of that coordinated response, which is outlined in the new DOJ National Pediatric SAFE Protocol. The main goals of the exam are to address the healthcare needs of the child, promote their healing and gather forensic evidence for potential use in the criminal justice system. Implementing a child centered response system can work in every community. The new Pediatric SAFE Protocol will be presented, along with a model of response from one tribal community.
C5
Madera
  TBD
C6
Pasadena
Joanne Shenandoah

HEAL (Help Every Abused Loved 1): Hope for the Future of our Children and Communities Through Empowerment and Healing Strategies Using the Arts
Since 1986 Dr. Shenandoah has been professionally providing traditional healing to the world through the gift of music. It is through this medium, which has brought her international recognition and awareness as a peace advocate throughout her career as well as a guardian and mentor for her audiences from new borns through death and life cycles on mother earth. Shenandoah illustrates the affect on the vibration of words, music and change for individuals and community healthcare workers as well as victims of violence whether they be children, adults or elders. In a world filled with violence, the wisdom of elders can be carried to those yet unborn and provide a safer and healthier environment to all. 
C7
Sierra/
Ventura
Diane Gout Understanding the Power of our Stories through Data
Attendees will understand that data collection can be a unique and important method of honoring human experiences. Collecting data is an opportunity to create compelling “stories” that reinforce sovereignty, influence decision-making, and promote accountability. Emphasis will be directed at ensuring the participation of individuals without creating further trauma.
C8
Smoke Tree 
D/E
Jackie McArthur
Daniel Taylor
Reducing System Inflicted Trauma in Child Sexual Abuse Investigations through a Formal Multi Disciplinary Team and Rural Child Advocacy Center on the Nez Perce Reservation
(Sponsored by Nez Perce Tribe and Office for Victims of Crime)
This workshop will explore the Nez Perce Tribe's journey in building a formalized Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) and Child Advocacy Center for coordinating a culturally sensitive and victim centered response in child sexual abuse and severe physical abuse. This presentation will address turnover in key positions, multi jurisdiction response, lessons in the field and challenges rural reservations face in both victim services and offender accountability. In 2012 The U.S. Department of Justice (USDOJ), Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Children's Justice Act Partnerships for Indian Communities awarded the Nez Perce Tribe a CTAS grant to financially and technically support these steps. The Nez Perce Tribe Child Advocacy Center is the only center between Boise, Idaho and Coeur d'alene Idaho, a distance of 458 miles.
C9
Smoke Tree
C
Arlene O’Brien
Caroline Antone
Cordelia Clapp

Empowering Women in Tribal Communities to Combat Sexual Violence through SAFESTAR: Sexual Assault Forensic Exam, Services, Training, Access and Resource
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women and Office for Victims of Crime)
This workshop will discuss how American Indian/Alaska Native communities that lack access to Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners can develop their own effective, culturally relevant health care and justice response to sexual violence in their communities through the U.S. Department of Justice/Office on Violence Against Women funded SAFESTAR Program.
C10
Smoke Tree
A/B
Yahya Fouz
Kristi A. Knight
Marcia Good
Tribal Access Project: Information Sharing and Access to Federal Databases
(Sponsored by SMART OfficeOffice of Tribal Justice and Federal Bureau of Investigation)
Implementation of the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) in tribal jurisdictions pose obstacles to many tribes because of the lack of access to federal databases. In collaboration with other divisions of Department of Justice, the Tribal Access Project (TAP) was developed to address this problem for SORNA tribes, and looking forward to any tribe with criminal justice needs. This session will discuss what TAP provides and the successes and failures of the first phase of the project, as well as the expansion of TAP to include non-SORNA tribes. This session will also discuss how tribes can gain access to federal information sharing databases outside of TAP and eligibility requirements for these systems.
C11
Mesquite 
G/H
Bethany Case
Kimberly Woodard
Lesley Kabotie
Paul Kabotie
Eidell Wasserman
Expanding the Vision: OVC's Tribal Community Wellness Centers Program
(Sponsored by Office for Victims of Crime)
This workshop will feature the three demonstration sites and technical assistance providers funded through Office for Victims of Crime Vision 21: Tribal Community Wellness Program. Participants will learn how these projects are expanding the reach of victim services in tribal communities by working in partnership with their communities to provide holistic approaches.
C12
Mesquite
E/F
Jim Walters Hidden Dangers - Child Abductions in Indian Country
(Sponsored by Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention)
This workshop looks at recent cases of Native American and Alaskan children abducted by sexual predators in their own communities, as well as community based programs to protect children from this growing danger.
C13
Santa Rosa
10:00 − 10:30 am BREAK (Break fully funded by Casey Family Programs and San Manual Band of Mission Indians, no federal fund utilized)  
10:30 − Noon Workshops D  
Marcia Good
Kate Manning
Shannon May
FedVIC Working Group: Improving the Federal Response to Victims
(Sponsored by U.S. Department of Justice)
The Federal Victims in Indian Country Working Group (FedVIC) was established in 2015 to identify gaps in services and proposed solutions to improve federal agencies' response to victims. FedVIC organizers will share the group's mission, membership, current projects, and future plants. Workshop participants will be invited to provide input on FedVIC's current projects and proposed solutions, and help shape informational/educational tools for federal employees working in Indian Country.
D1 
Chino
Melissa Riley Strategies for Increasing Tribal Council Support for Justice Planning
This workshop will assist participants with exploring strategies to increase tribal council support in tribal justice planning. Participants will explore suggested strategies for communicating with tribal council and understanding everyone’s role in tribal justice system planning.
D2 
Pueblo
Brian Hendrix Dually Adjudicated Juveniles
The focus of this presentation is on the transition of deprived children from foster care into the juvenile justice system and their increased risk for re-victimization specifically through human trafficking. The presentation will also highlight some promising practices initiated by Oklahoma tribes related to these at-risk youth.
D3
Mohave
Learning Center
Mike A. Jackson Anthony Gastelum
Georgina Gastelum
Circle Peacemaking: Assisting Victims, Family, Extended Families and Communities to Begin Healing
Kake Circle Peacemaking is "Harnessing our Collective Wisdom: Strengthening the Circle of Safety, Justice and Healing" Tribal People have always had "Core Tribal (Community) Values that are interpreted as our "Laws of the Land" the very Values that has kept our Tribes and Clans together since Creation Time. This workshop includes handouts that could be used as a guide for doing Community Circle Peacemaking after taking this workshop. This workshop also includes a 28-minute DVD about Kake Circle Peacemaking and a mock Circle for people to experience the process and begin their own Circle Peacemaking. Circle Peacemaking creates a safe place for the victim, family, friends, tribe, community, police, attorneys, counselors to begin a dialog about love, respect, forgiveness and healing.
D4
Catalina
  TBD
D5
Madera
Elsie Boudreau
Debbie Demientieff
Leadership for Results: Capacity Building in Response to Sexual and Interpersonal Violence
A strengths-based, action-learning and collaborative approach to igniting leadership capacities will be highlighted in this interactive workshop. This framework fosters meaningful and innovative sustainable change from within communities addressing sexual and interpersonal violence. It is the belief that leadership resides in everyone and therefore can be nourished and nurtured.
D6
Pasadena
Nancy Bordeaux
LeMoine LaPointe
Intervention, Healing and Transcending Beyond Historical Trauma
This workshop provides a cultural approach, motivating and empowering participants as they learn the potential for healing, change and transformation within families and communities. Participant are given the opportunity to express and contribute their thoughts in group dialogue, also to transfer this knowledge into their place of work.
D7
Sierra/
Ventura
Steven Hafner
BJ Spamer
Danielle M. Weiss
Effective use of the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) for Case Resolution
(Sponsored by National Institute of Justice)
Although the problem of missing persons and unidentified human remains in this country has existed for a long time, significant progress has been made in recent years. In 2003, the DNA Initiative was launched and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) began funding major efforts to maximize the use of technology in our criminal justice system. Much of NIJ's work has focused on developing tools to investigate and solve the cases of missing persons and unidentified decedents. NIJ’s National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs) is a national centralized repository and resource center that can be searched by medical examiners, coroners, law enforcement officials, and the public in hopes of resolving these cases. This workshop will provide participants with the NamUs history and purpose, evaluation of system use for American Indian and Alaska Native people, and tips for effective system use.
D8
Smoke Tree 
D/E
Alane Breland
Diane Enos
Utilizing the MDT for Investigation and Prosecution of Crimes Against Children in Indian Country: A Trauma-Informed Approach
When a child is the victim of a crime, ensuring safety and emotional support for the child and family is as vital as gathering and preserving evidence for trial. Commitment to a trauma-informed, multi-disciplinary approach minimizes trauma while promoting coordination and collaboration to ensure an effective response from every department.
D9
Smoke Tree
C
Victoria Sweet The Intersection of Child Welfare and Domestic Violence Cases: Addressing the Unique Needs of American Indian and Alaska Native Families
(Sponsored by National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges)
Child welfare cases are emotional and difficult under any circumstance, but when domestic violence is involved they become more complex. This presentation will explore both information of how domestic violence impacts children and how the system treats domestic violence victims while also addressing unique issues that Native families face.
D10
Smoke Tree
A/B
Korey Wahwassuck
Jennifer A. Fahey
Developing Tribal-State Joint Jurisdiction Courts to Improve Public Safety and Help Heal Communities
(Sponsored by Bureau of Justice Assistance)
This presentation will provide information on reducing criminal recidivism, improving public safety, and contributing to better relations between tribal and local communities through the development of tribal and non-tribal joint jurisdiction courts.
D11
Mesquite 
G/H
Leslie A. Hagen Investigating and Prosecuting the Non-Fatal Strangulation Case
(Sponsored by U.S. Department of Justice Office of Legal Education)  
Some American Indian/Alaska Native communities experience very high rates of intimate partner violence, to include serious assaults like strangulation. Strangulation is one of the best predictors for the subsequent homicide of victims of intimate partner violence. The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 amended the federal assault statute to include a new federal felony - "assault of a spouse, intimate partner, or dating partner by strangling, suffocating, or attempting to strangle or suffocate." This session will focus on the successful investigation and prosecution of the non-fatal strangulation case while incorporating a trauma-informed victim response.
D12
Mesquite
E/F
Hallie Bongar White
Caroline Antone

Prison Rape Elimination Act and American Indian/Alaska Native Incarcerated Victims of Violent Crime
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women and Office for Victims of Crime)
This presentation will focus on the requirements of the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act for tribal correctional facilities as well as describe successful strategies for outreach and services to American Indian/Alaska Native victims of violent crime who are incarcerated in tribal and other correctional facilities.
D13
Santa Rosa
Noon − 1:30 pm Working Luncheon
(Fully funded by conference registration fees)
East Pool Deck
(Weather Permitting)
  Emcee
Elton Naswood (Navajo)
Capacity Building Specialist
Office of Minority Health
 
  Invocation
Abby Abinanti (Yurok)
Chief Judge, Yurok Tribal Court
President, Board of Directors
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
 
  Innovative Approaches to Enhancing Safety, Justice and Healing for Victims
Dianne Barker-Harrold (Cherokee)
Senior Technical Assistance Specialist
Unified Solutions Tribal Community Development
 
  Tribal Victim Advocacy Awards
Bonnie HeavyRunner Tribal Victim Advocacy Awards
Presented by Iris HeavyRunner PrettyPaint and Family
 
  Strengthening the Circle of Healing Through Music
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida-Iroquois)
Grammy Award Winning Singer/Performer/Composer/ Actress/Lecturer
Former Co-Chair, Attorney General’s Advisory Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence
 
1:30 − 3:00 pm Workshops E  
Nikki Borchardt Campbell
Natasha Gourd
Shawn Watts
Brett Shelton
Promoting Traditional and Restorative Principles to Strengthen Safety, Justice, and Healing
(Sponsored by Bureau of Justice Assistance)
Crime, violence, and trauma negatively impact victims/survivors, offenders, and cause collateral consequences in families and communities. Panelists explain approaches and resources using holistic justice --drawing from traditional wisdom and restorative principles to address harm, promote healing, and account for historical trauma’s role in the impacts felt in our communities.
E1 
Chino
Paula Julian
Vanessa Chauhan
Jenna Novak
Gwendolyn Packard
Coming Together to Address Human Trafficking in Native Communities
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women)
What is human trafficking and what does it look like in Indigenous, tribal communities? This workshop will look at: Human Trafficking in the US, Human Trafficking in Indigenous, tribal communities, the Historical context - co-occurrence with other injustices, colonial trauma response, modern day slavery in trafficking communities. What can tribal communities do to address it? This workshop will review: How to identify victims/survivors; How to engage with Indigenous, tribal domestic violence and sexual assault resources to build capacity; Current models of Indigenous, tribal communities addressing human trafficking/promising practices. And finally, a call to action: tribal coalitions and tribal governments must come together; tapping into current Indigenous, tribal domestic violence/sexual assault responses; educating Indigenous, tribal communities; Indigenous, tribal student engagement toolkit.
E2 
Pueblo
Cheyenne Sanders
Laura White Woods
Lauren van Schilfgaarde
Healing to Wellness Courts: Holistic Justice
The Yurok Tribal Court is a Wellness Court model that boldly asserts Yurok law while identifying innovate ways to increase the net resources of the tribe through strategic partnerships. This workshop highlights innovative tribal programming and ways tribes in Public Law 280 states can creatively exercise tribal sovereignty to promote safety and justice.
E3
Mohave
Learning Center
Elena Giacci Quiet Bravery: Learning from Native Women’s Experiences with Partner Violence and Reproductive Coercion to Promote Resiliency and Harm Reduction
This workshop will explore how Native American women describe the cultural, structural and relationship factors affecting pregnancy intention, contraceptive behavior, violence exposure and reproductive coercion, their stories of strength and resiliency, and how to create survivor-centered prevention and intervention programs.
E4
Catalina
Rosemary McCombs Maxey
Sarah Deer
Tribal Language, Justice and Healing: Finding Our Voice
Indigenous language is deeply tied to traditional values. This workshop will provide an example of how language immersion programs can help survivors of crime and their advocates learn about traditional values to promote victim safety and offender accountability.
E5
Madera
Dolores Subia BigFoot Another Way to View Trauma Informed Care: Being a Good Relative in Indian Country
(Sponsored by Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention)
This presentation will provide an overview of trauma informed care and will also cover examples of American Indian traditional practices that demonstrate trauma informed care principles. Information will be shared to gain an understanding of how culturally based healing practices are applicable today. Additionally information will be shared to gain an understanding of how culturally based practices can be used in program practice for children and youth and their families.
E6
Pasadena
Pam Iron Impact of Culture on Victim's Resiliency
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women)
The purpose of this workshop is to deliver training for participants who desire to develop strategies in their communities to help victim's become more resilient. The workshop covers how to maintain and develop cultural identity and critical cultural knowledge and practices. Discussion's on the impact of feelings and coping with adversity, along with how one responds to different stressors. There will be handouts to support the activities.
E7
Sierra/
Ventura
Leslie A. Hagen Focus Group: North American Working Group on Violence against Indigenous Women and Girls
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women and the Bureau of Indian Affair’s Office of Justice Services)
On October 14, 2016 the first meeting of the North American Working Group on Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls was held in Washington DC. The meeting was organized by the Office of the Vice President, the National Security Council, and the White House Council on Women and Girls; it brought together more than 50 senior officials from the governments of the United States, Mexico, and Canada, to discuss ways to enhance regional cooperation to address violent crimes against Indigenous women and girls across North America, including human trafficking. Several initiatives were announced at this historic meeting. In addition, all three countries committed to convening the next high-level meeting in 2017, which will be hosted by Canada with the full participation of Indigenous representatives. The Office on Violence Against Women and the Bureau of Indian Affair’s Office of Justice Services would like to hear from individuals living and working in Indian Country about border-related issues affecting victims of domestic and sexual violence. Input gathered at this focus group and tribal consultations is important to shaping the work of the North American Working Group on Violence against Indigenous Women and Girls.
E8
Smoke Tree 
D/E
Carrie Frias
Eliabeth Duran
Evonne Martinez
Kim McGinnis
Working Collaboratively to Address Violence in our Community
Tribal leadership, legal counsel, social services, law enforcement and the tribal court can work together toward a safe, just, and healing environment for victims of crime. Representatives from the Pueblo of Pojoaque will guide a discussion on how key stakeholders work together to hold offenders accountable and keep victims of crime safe in our small tribal community. This workshop will explore how traditional values compliment the independent branches of tribal government, and how collaboration with outside agencies supports victims of crime in the Pueblo. The Pueblo’s westernized court system incorporates traditional ways of working with crime victims and offenders to maximize safety, while acknowledging that the offender will continue to live in the community or will eventually return.
E9
Smoke Tree
C
Hannah Smith
David Hutchinson
Patricia Long
Data Driven System Accountability: How the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is Using Data Monitoring to Provide Safety, Justice and Healing to Tribal Families
(Sponsored by Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians)
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians present a model for data-driven integrated services for court-involved families providing tribal leadership/courts a way to hold systems accountable for reducing recidivism, delivering -informed services, and re-integration into community. Interdisciplinary teams integrate services and use joint case management, shared data and reporting to keep themselves accountable to families.
E10
Smoke Tree
A/B
Gayla Stewart
Shannon Cozzoni
Jacque Secondine Hensley
Lou Stretch
Carmin Tecumeh-Williams
Collaboration with Tribal, State and Federal Agencies on Providing effective Victim Services
(Sponsored by Office for Victims of Crime and Offices of the United States Attorneys)
This workshop will address innovative initiatives throughout Oklahoma to coordinate and provide services to all crime victims. With the many different programs throughout the state, this workshop will provide an effective way of collaborating so that crime victims receive the best services.
E11
Mesquite 
G/H
Melissa Powless Chacon
Lucille Echohawk
Foundation Funding
(Sponsored by Native Americans in Philanthropy)
This workshop will provide philanthropy information and hands-on development strategies to build participants knowledge and understanding for establishing and maintaining winning relationships with foundation funders. Native American facilitators, Melissa Powless Chacon (Oneida) and Lucille Echo Hawk (Pawnee) will bring expert views from professional experiences working with foundations, nonprofits and tribes.
E12
Mesquite
E/F
  TBD
E13
Santa Rosa
3:00 − 3:30 pm BREAK (Break fully funded by Casey Family Programs and San Manual Band of Mission Indians, no federal fund utilized)  
3:30 − 5:00 pm Workshops F  
Eileen West
Carlette Randall
Roshanda Shoulders
Taking Care of Our Own: Using Federal Funding to Strengthen and Support Tribal Child Welfare Systems
(Sponsored by Children’s Bureau)
A child victim of abuse or neglect may not be able to safely remain at home and must be placed in foster care. If a child cannot safely return home, another option may be customary adoption or guardianship. Federal funding is available to help with the placement costs of out of home care as well as administrative expenses, if certain criteria are met. The federally funded Capacity Building Center for Tribes can assist tribal child welfare systems through work on policies and procedures, organizational assessments and other activities. This workshop will provide a broad overview of the federal funding under title IV-E; the plan a tribe would need to develop; accessing capacity building services to address child welfare program capacity development; and areas where to include culture.
F1 
Chino
Steve Aycock Using the Power of Contempt to Protect Victims from Non-Indian Perpetrators
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women)
As more non-Indian litigants appear in and before tribal courts, an understanding of the court's powers of contempt becomes more important. With Dollar General and the Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction, the possibility of contemptuous behavior is ever growing. System players need to understand what contempt is, who it covers and what procedures are needed. In addition, Tribal codes should be created/revised to specify what powers the court can use and what procedures and relief/punishment can be imposed.
F2 
Pueblo
Mary Kathryn Nagle VAWA at a Crossroads: the Constitutionality of Tribal Jurisdiction over non-Indians from the Perspective of the Women Jurisdiction Protects
Pipestem Law Partner Mary Kathryn Nagle will discuss the constitutional challenges to VAWA's Special Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction, as well as the advocacy she partners have undertaken to educate on the constitutionality of tribal jurisdiction. Putting the voices of Native women survivors front and center, Nagle has staged her play SLIVER OF A FULL MOON at Law Schools across the country (www.sliverofafullmoon.org). Tribal Nations were successful in VAWA 2013 because Congress heard the stories of our Native women survivors. Now, as Tribal Nations act to protect and preserve the jurisdiction that VAWA 2013 restored, we must continue to place the voices of our Native women in the forefront.
F3
Mohave
Learning Center
Sarah Henry
Kelly Gaines Stoner
Protection Orders and Full Faith and Credit in Indian Country
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women)
Protection orders are one tool that can be used to enhance the safety of Native women experiencing domestic violence and increase offender accountability. This session will be interactive, providing information on the issuance and enforcement of protection orders, including information on the enforcement of tribal orders outside of Indian country.
F4
Catalina
Dianne Barker-Harrold
Gayle Thom
Homicide in Indian Country: Advocates Responding to Homicide and Advocacy for Survivors of Homicide Victims
(Sponsored by Office for Victims of Crime)
This workshop is to provide information related to providing services to survivors of victims of homicide and challenges victim advocates encounter. We will identify victim impact in homicide cases and describe 5 duties and 6 challenges for victim advocates in homicide cases.
F5
Madera
  (Room closed for set up)
F6
Pasadena
Thomas Smittle The Way of the Horse: (Sunka Wakan Wicohan) From Historical Trauma to Historical Greatness
(Sponsored by BIG Heart Ranch)
The Red Horse Nation (RHN) is based on nurturing Historical Greatness through connection with horses. As most of the clinical world focuses on PTSD, Red Horse Nations' Horse Inspired Growth and Healing (HIGH) focuses on increasing Post Traumatic Growth and greatness. Through experiential mounted and unmounted activities, RHN's HIGH activities nurture a sense of belonging, cultural identity, horsemanship through connection not control and moving with the horse with saddle and tack.
F7
Sierra/
Ventura
Germaine Omish-Lucero Healing Tokens: A Pathway of Healing Through Art
(Sponsored by Office on Violence Against Women)
A token is a sacred object that can provide protection and promote healing. Native American tokens are more than just an object; a person’s own beliefs determine the difference between a token and an object. Through the creation of a personal token, participants can find healing through art. In addition, participants will engage in a talking circle to discuss the healing token they created. This is the follow-up for them to share the meanings behind what they created and how they can use it as a token on their path to healing.
F8
Smoke Tree 
D/E
Desiree Coyote
David Williams
At the Scene: Law Enforcement and Advocacy Partnerships for Safety and Accountability
(Sponsored by Bureau of Indian Affairs and Office on Violence Against Women)
Tribal law enforcement and community-based advocacy collaboration accomplished for the benefit of victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. Historically this form of collaboration was minimal or in some cases nonexistent. Investigating these crimes can prove difficult within check board tribal communities. Barriers vary and past community trauma exacerbates it.
F9
Smoke Tree
C
Hedi Bogda
Sonia DeVelez
Juana Majel Dixon
Karen Nelson
Development and Sustainability of a Tribal Sexual Assault Response Team (SART)
The presentation will consist of determining the need for a Tribal SART program, what agencies should be involved in the collaboration, what is needed to create a multi-disciplinary Tribal SART, what protocols and codes/ordinances are needed to implement the Tribal SART, what cases are handled and what is needed to sustain the Tribal SART.
F10
Smoke Tree
A/B
Jade Carela
Tate London
Paula Newman
Commander S. Pruitt

Building a Strong Multi-Disciplinary Team to Address Child Abuse in Indian Country
(Sponsored by Tulalip Tribes of Washington and Office for Victims of Crime)
Child abuse in Indian country must be addressed through a multi-disciplinary approach in order to effectively address crimes against children. The systems designed to protect children often only create more harm, barriers and confusion, particularly so in Indian country with inherent multi-jurisdictional complexities. The Tulalip Multi-Disciplinary Team is an indigenous, tribal-based team in existence since 2009. Creating a sustainable, high-functioning team that genuinely collaborates in decision making takes focused effort and dedication of the team members. This panel will share their experience, including from those who have been members of the team consistently since its inception.
F11
Mesquite 
G/H
Leslie A. Hagen Investigating and Prosecuting Alcohol Facilitated Sexual Assault
(Sponsored by U.S. Department of Justice Office of Legal Education)  
Widespread anecdotal evidence in Indian country indicates that many, if not a majority, of sexual assault crimes perpetrated against adolescents and adults involve alcohol use by the victim, the defendant, or both. Despite the prevalence of alcohol facilitated sexual assault, a number of barriers to a successful prosecution may exists. For example, the jury may question whether the sex was consensual or the jury may blame the victim that she put herself at risk by voluntarily consuming alcohol. And, these cases are complicated by the physical manifestations of alcohol like victims being unable to clearly perceive or remember the details of the assault. This session will focus on tips and tools for dealing with these challenges and also overcoming the consent defense.
F12
Mesquite
E/F
Terrence Shanigan Proactive Problem Solving for Public Safety and Corrections in Indian Country
This workshop will help participants to understand correct problem identification, develop a root cause analysis of the problem, and design targeted solutions that are culturally appropriate and reduce incidents of crime and recidivism. The presenters hope to share a paradigm shift in thinking in regard to how progress, improvements and success are measured within public safety and corrections.
F13
Santa Rosa
5:00 − 7:00 pm Wiping of Tears Ceremony (Optional)
James Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
Pasadena
     

Saturday, December 10, 2016

 
9:00 − Noon Closing Plenary Session California Ballroom
  Emcees
Sarah Deer (Mvskoke), Professor
Mitchell Hamline School of Law
MacArthur Fellow, 2014

Kelly Stoner (Cherokee), Victim Advocacy Legal Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
 
  Closing Chair Ceremony
Honoring Victims/Survivors of Violence
James Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
  Harnessing Our Collective Wisdom with Songs of Honoring and for Safety: Honoring/Traveling Song
The Boyz
 
  BREAK (break food fully funded by Casey Family Programs, federal funds limited to beverages only)  
  Another Way to View Trauma Informed Care: Being a Good Relative in Indian Country
Dee Bigfoot (Caddo Nation of Oklahoma)
Director
Indian Country Child Trauma Center
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Former Member, Attorney General’s Advisory Committee
on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence

Where Do We Go from Here? Enhancing Tribal Ability to Strengthen Safety, Justice and Healing for Victims of Crime
Moderator

Kelly Stoner (Cherokee), Victim Advocacy Legal Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute

Panelists
Eric Broderick
Real Admiral
Former Deputy Administrator
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Former Member, Attorney General’s Advisory Committee
on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence

Troy A. Eid, Commission Chairman
Indian Law and Order Commission

John Dossett, Chief Counsel
National Congress of American Indians

Deborah Parker (Tulalip Tribes)
Former Vice Chair, Board of Directors
Tulalip Tribe

Alfred Urbina.
Attorney General
Pascua Yaqui Tribe

Closing Remarks
Allison Turkel
Deputy Director
Office for Victims of Crimes
Office of Justice Programs
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Retiring of Colors
First Nations Women Warriors Color Guard
 
  Closing Blessing
James Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota) Spiritual Leader
 







Subpages (1): Bios