Please note that the conference agenda is subject to change. You may now download a Printable Conference Agenda and view Floor Plan of the Conference Hotel.

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

 
9:00 − 5:00 pm Pre-Conference Institutes
(Separate registration required)
 
4:00 − 9:00 pm On-Site Conference Registration
and Distribution of Materials
Santa Rosa
5:00 − 7:30 pm Conference Reception (Optional)
Reception Fully Funded by:
Casey Family Programs
Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation
Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians
San Manuel Band of Mission Indians
(No federal funds utilized)
East Pool Deck
(Weather Permitting)
  Strength from within: Rekindling Tribal Traditions through Music
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida Nation)
Grammy Award Winning
Singer/Performer/Composer/Actress/Lecturer
 

Thursday, December 6, 2012

 
7:00 − 9:00 am On-Site Conference Registration
and Distribution of Materials
Santa Rosa
9:00 − Noon Plenary Opening Session California Ballroom
  Emcees
Sarah Deer (Mvskoke), Assistant Professor
William Mitchell School of Law
Bonnie Clairmont (Ho-Chunk), Tribal Victim Advocacy Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
 
  Opening Invocation
Ernest Siva (Serrano/Cahuilla)
 
  Honoring Victim/Survivor Voices
Flag/Honor Song
The Boyz
 
  Posting of Colors
Color Guard
 
  Welcome
Hon. Jeff L. Grubbe (Agua Caliente)
Chairman, Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians
 
  Cultural Ceremony
Honoring Ceremony for Victims/Survivors of Violence
Jim Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
  Short Video Excerpt:
Reclaim the Fire
 
  Break (break food fully funded by Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, federal funds limited to beverages only)  
  Opening Remarks
Mary Lou Leary
Acting Assistant Attorney General
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Strength from Within: Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
And Mobilizing Tribal Government

Deborah Parker (Tulalip Tribes)
Vice Chair, Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation
 
  Strength from Within:
Rekindling Tribal Traditions to assist Victims of Crime

Kelly Stoner (Cherokee Descent)
Director, Native American Legal Resource Center
Oklahoma City University School of Law (PowerPoint)
 
Noon − 1:30 pm LUNCH (on your own)  
1:30 − 3:00 pm Workshops A
Sarah Deer
Courtney Allensworth
Developing Tribal Elder Abuse Laws
This workshop will explore the importance of drafting tribally specific elder-abuse codes. Discussion will explore the unique needs of Indian elders, the significance of integrating tribal customs and values into a code, and the importance of drafting criminal and civil codes so that victims of elder abuse are protected. (PowerPoint)
A1
Andreas
Nigel Perrote
Jude Foster
American Indian Community Response to Sexual Assault in the Urban Setting
Utilizing the eight-step Sexual Assault Multidisciplinary Action Response Team (SMART) Model, we will speak about promoting safety, justice, and health in urban American Indian populations through a coordinated community response. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
A2
Chino
John Young
Hallie Bongar White
Victim Rights in Indian Country—Advocating for Safety, Justice, and Healing on Behalf of Crime Victims in the Federal, State, and Tribal Justice Systems
This presentation will outline and discuss the various statutory provisions and procedures available to victims of crime in the federal, state, and tribal justice systems. Presenters will discuss the utilization of these rights and remedies as a means of promoting safety, justice, and healing in tribal communities. (PowerPoint)
A3
Pueblo
Darrell Dowty Providing Safe, Secure, and Fair Tribal Justice Forums for Victims of Crime
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
The presentation will focus on victim safety and security in tribal courts and will advocate for victim-sensitive planning of the physical courtroom layout; the effective use of court rules of decorum and conduct; and the impact of tribal culture on compliance with Indian Civil Rights Act protections including victim-sensitive alternative methods of confrontation. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
A4
Mohave Learning Center
Kathryn Ford
Keahi Souza
Hidden Victims: Tribal Justice and Social Service Response to Survivors of Prostitution and Sexual Exploitation
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
This workshop will begin with an exploration of sexual exploitation, including prevalence, dynamics, and effects on victims and the unique historical context and dynamics of sexual exploitation of Native women and children. Implications for intervention by tribal justice systems and social services will be provided, including possible adaptation of existing programs and practices from tribal and nontribal settings. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss implementation of recommended practices in their home communities. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
A5
Catalina
Jeremy Nevilles-Sorell
Sarah Curtiss
Using Traditional Concepts to Address Victimization in Native Communities
This training takes participants through a process of working with community members, by utilizing traditional concepts, to organize and educate on violence against women topics. Participants will learn how to take the seven Grandfather Teachings and adapt them to their community for a yearlong public education campaign. Group activities, survey information, and discussion topics will be provided and a step-by-step process will be outlined along with stories of what worked well with Mending the Sacred Hoop’s "Too Seek Knowledge," or in Ojibwe "Nanda Gikendan," project. (PowerPoint) (PowerPoint) (HandOut) (HandOut)
A6
Madera
Genoveva Antone
Cordelia Clapp
Arlene O'Brien
Vicarious Trauma: Traditional Modalities of Prevention and Response for Service Providers
First responders and service providers in Indian country are at high risk of experiencing vicarious trauma when addressing violent crime victimization in their communities. This interactive workshop will explore traditional, indigenous ways of prevention, management, response, and healing of vicarious trauma, and will provide participants with the opportunity to develop their own individual or programmatic strategies to achieve optimal mental, spiritual, emotional, and physical health. (PowerPoint)
A7
Pasadena
Bonnie Clairmont
Alyssa Ben
Beverly Cotton
Kathleen Gless
Shannon May
Eidell Wasserman
Charity White
A Dialogue with Tribal and Federal Representatives: Showcasing an Office for Victims of Crime—Funded Demonstration Initiative to Establish Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner/Sexual Assault Response Team Programs in Three Diverse Tribal Communities
In 2011, the Office for Victims of Crime funded three demonstration sites, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, Southern Indian Health Council, and the Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation, to enhance their capacity to provide high-quality multidisciplinary victim-centered services and support for adult and child victims of sexual assault through the development of Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner/Sexual Assault Response Team programs. The three demonstration sites are diverse with one community under Public Law 280 jurisdiction and diverse with respect to size of the communities. The Office for Victims of Crime also enlisted the Indian Health Service and the Federal Bureau of Investigation as project partners to work jointly with the Office for Victims of Crime, the three funded tribal communities to support the overall goal and strategies of the initiative. In addition, the Office for Victims of Crime created a Federal Advisory Committee to provide recommendations on funding, training, and technical assistance priorities and to identify current federal resources, duplication, and gaps in services. The anticipated long-term achievements of the program include an enhanced capacity for communities and the criminal and tribal justice systems to respond to sexual assault and an increased sense of fairness and satisfaction with the criminal justice system by victims and community members. (PowerPoint)
A8
Sierra
Jacqueline "Jax" Agtuca
Juana Majel Dixon
Violence Against Women Act Reauthorization: Addressing the Oliphant in the Room
This workshop will focus on the SAVE Native Women Act provisions of the Violence Against Women reauthorization bill, with an emphasis on the limited criminal jurisdictional fix which would reestablish limited tribal jurisdiction over non-Indians in domestic violence cases. Tribes have not been able to assert criminal jurisdiction over non-Indian defendants since the 1978 United States Supreme Court decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indian Tribe, 435 U.S. 191 (1978).
A9
Ventura
Michelle Rivard Parks
Kelly Gaines Stoner
Sentencing Considerations in Tribal Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Cases
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
This session will provide participants with the tips and information relevant during the sentencing phase of a domestic violence or sexual assault trial. Specific discussion will be had on important language for court dispositions, firearms disqualifications, no contact orders, and other such matters.
A10
SmokeTree F
Gayle Thom
Stanley Pryor
Responding to Native American and Alaskan Native Crime Victims with Disabilities
When those victimized also have disabilities, it is essential that service providers are knowledgeable about cultural and spiritual approaches to healing. Unfortunately, data also clearly suggests the percentage of Native Americans with disabilities is higher than any other racial group in the United States. Although no segment of society is immune to violence, crime statistics involving American Indians and Alaska Natives indicate the need for professionals to prepare themselves to provide services in a culturally responsive manner. This interactive workshop covers what law enforcement, medical, and multidisciplinary team members need to know about responding to American Indian and Alaska Native victims in a way that respects and honors cultural and spiritual traditions rather than viewing those traditions as complexities. Knowledge, skills, and attitudes of service providers will be enhanced with new and advanced skills to better serve victims of crime, abuse, and neglect with disabilities.(PowerPoint)  (HandOut) (HandOut) (HandOut)
A11
SmokeTree D/E
Steven Perry If You Can’t Measure It, You Can’t Effectively Manage It: Understanding Crime and Victimization on Tribal Lands
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance and the Federal Bureau of Investigation)
To effectively manage crime and violence within tribal communities and allocate scare resources effectively, justice professionals require the ability to measure the crimes committed and defendants adjudicated through tribal courts in relation to the reservation or service population. Pursuant to the Tribal Law and Order Act requirements, the Bureau of Justice Statistics recently released the 2012 "Tribal Crime Data Collection Activities" report highlighting collaborative efforts to improve the accuracy and reliability of tribal crime and justice statistics. This workshop will present selected findings and analyses on tribal law enforcement agencies reporting to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program, the development and design of the 2012 National Survey of Tribal Courts Systems, and improvement in federal justice statistics. Tribal law enforcement, judges, court clerks and administrators, and program managers are encouraged to attend this workshop. (PowerPoint)
A12
SmokeTree A/B
3:00 − 3:30 pm BREAK (break fully funded by Casey Family Programs, no federal funds utilized)  
3:30 − 5:00 pm Workshops B  
Bill Thorne
Gina Jackson
Larry Williams
David Kelly (via video)
Children’s Bureau Tribal Court Improvement Programs
(Sponsored by the Children's Bureau)
This session will feature innovative examples of tribal courts working to improve their tribal child welfare system including strategies for developing a collaborative system improvement problem-solving group. Information about opportunities including ideas for partnerships will be shared including working with state Court Improvement Programs (CIPs). For the first time funding has been made available to tribes for Tribal Court Improvement for child welfare through the Children’s Bureau. While this funding is currently serving a limited number of tribes, there are many ways tribal courts are improving their child welfare systems by utilizing the strengths of the community as well as other resources. (HandOut) (HandOut) (HandOut) (HandOut)
B1
Andreas
Joanne Shenandoah
Douglas George-Kanentiio
Healing through Music and Traditional Knowledge: Forgiveness and Grief
Joanne Shenandoah, PhD, will present a session on healing through music. Many healers are expected to deal with the grief from victims who have suffered a great loss. Many ongoing problems with victims center on the inability to forgive. The Iroquois have belief systems to help with forgiveness and the grieving process. In this session, she will share how the traditional knowledge of the Iroquois includes forgiveness and rituals for the grieving process. She will also present her latest music video, which was written for the children of hospice nationwide. (Video) (Hyperlink) (Hyperlink)
B2
Chino
Eric Szatkowski
Susan Whitehorse
Protecting Children in a Digital World: Current Trends in Internet and Cell Phone Exploitation
Our children are into technology more than ever: social networking like Facebook, smartphones, Skype, online gaming, and more. So are predators, child pornographers, and pimps involved in human trafficking. Learn the latest trends in exploitation and rescuing missing kids -- and get engaged in the battle to keep our kids safe in a digital world. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
B3
Pueblo
Joyce Moser
Paul V. Gallegos
Sally Hencken
Holly Hensher
Olin Jones
Creating Bridges of Trust across Jurisdictional Boundaries to Increase Safety and Justice: Humboldt County District Attorney and Tribal Governments Roundtable
In 2003, Paul V. Gallegos, the newly elected Humboldt County district attorney was approached by Keith Taylor, Executive Director of the Center for Indian Law and Economic Justice, with the idea of creating a platform for representatives from all of the Humboldt County Tribes and Rancherias to discuss concerns and devise strategies related to community safety and the administration of justice in Humboldt County. Paul V. Gallegos and Joyce Moser, District Attorney Victim Witness Coordinator, worked together, reaching out to the Native American communities in hopes of creating bridges of trust. April 26, 2007, was the first ever Humboldt County District Attorney and Tribal Governments Roundtable held in the District Attorney Law Library with plenty of good food. Since that time these monthly meetings have been hosted at various tribal locations in addition to our original meeting place. This roundtable has served to enhance communications between tribal and nontribal agencies.
B4
Mohave Learning Center
Josette Peltier All Nations Women’s Society
All Nations Women’s Society was founded in September 2011 to provide female students in grades 9 – 12 residing at the Flandreau Indian School with cultural opportunities for healing and growth. Development of cultural programs and activities relevant to Native youth will be presented with opportunity for interactive discussion. (PowerPoint)
B5
Catalina
Elton Naswood
Mattee Jim
Mending the Rainbow: Working with the Native LGBT/Two-Spirit Community
This workshop is designed to focus on tribal victim services from a tribal perspective, often using the sharing of stories and experiences as teaching and learning tools. Native lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/two-spirit violent victimization are issues that service providers and individuals of this specific population must be made aware of. The information is designed for tribal communities and provides culturally and traditionally based responses to the needs of Native lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/two-spirit victims. (PowerPoint)
B6
Madera
Wendy Schlater
Jacqueline "Jax" Agtuca
Doris Beresford
Carolyn Coultress
Juana Majel Dixon
Summer Funes
Walking Until the Violence Stops: Community Organizing to Increase Safety for Native Women
In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians’ Avellaka Program and Women’s Advisory Committee organized a historic awareness walk. The walk is now an annual event that rotates between southern California Indian tribes. Organizers of the walk will share their lessons and premier a documentary video of the 2010, 2011 and 2012 walks.
B7
Pasadena

Arlene O’Brien
Genoveva Antone
Cordelia Clapp

Empowering Women in Our Communities to Combat Sexual Violence through SAFESTAR: Sexual Assault Forensic Exams, Services, Training, Access, and Resources
This workshop will discuss how American Indian and Alaska Native communities that lack access to Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners can develop their own effective, culturally relevant health care and justice responses to sexual violence in their communities through the U.S. Department of Justice/Office on Violence against Women–funded program SAFESTAR: Sexual Assault Forensic Exams, Services, Training, Access, and Resources. (PowerPoint)

B8
Sierra

Jennifer Pierce-Weeks
Kim Day
The Lethality of Strangulation
Strangulation is a type of asphyxiation characterized by closure of the blood vessels and/or air passages of the neck as a result of external pressure, and accounts for 10 percent of all violent deaths in the United States. Studies indicate that 23 percent to 68 percent of female intimate-partner violence victims experienced at least one strangulation-related incident from their abusive male partner during their lifetime. Overall, women who experience nonfatal strangulation by an intimate partner have greater than sevenfold odds of becoming a victim of homicide. In this workshop, participants will recognize the patterns of injury and lethality associated with strangulation and summarize the critical need for medical intervention, both from the victim as well as the legal perspective. (PowerPoint)
B9
Ventura
Michelle Rivard Parks
Kelly Gaines Stoner
Working with Victims through the Trial Process
This session will provide participants with important tips and tools that can be utilized by tribal prosecutors and advocates to ensure that necessary communication occurs with victims during the trial process and the importance of such communications to facilitating victim safety. Victims’ rights and victims’ rights legislation will also be discussed.
B10
SmokeTree F
Lisa Jaeger
Mishal Gaede
David Raasch
Circles of Healing and Justice
The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how the strength of "Circles" is being used in Alaska to not only heal victims of crime but also to rekindle cultural practices in holding offenders accountable through community-based sentencing. Community ownership of the outcome is promising to be a more effective means of addressing crime. (PowerPoint)
B11
SmokeTree D/E
Christine Crossland
Joseph Masters
Lauree Morton
Carolyn Peter
André Rosay
Katherine Tepas
Victimization Surveys and Their Impact on Safety, Justice, and Healing
(Sponsored by the National Institute of Justice)
This presentation summarizes results from the oversample of American Indians and Alaska Natives that were included in the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. It also summarizes results from the Alaska Victimization Survey. Practitioners and researchers will discuss how results are used to improve safety, justice, and healing. (PowerPoint)
B12
SmokeTree A/B
7:00 − 9:30 pm Conference Working Dinner (fully funded by conference registration fees) California Ballroom 
  Emcee
Elton Naswood (Navajo)
Capacity Building Specialist
National Native AIDS Prevention Center
 
  Invocation
James Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
  Strength from within: Rekindling Tribal Traditions
Kaweeah Bird Singers
 
  Short Video Excerpts:  
  Introduction of United States Attorney
Mary Lou Leary
Acting Assistant Attorney General
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Role of United States Attorneys in Promoting Tribal Strength from Within to Assist Victims of Crime
United States Attorney (TBD)
 
  Role of Youth and “Reclaim the Fire” video in Rekindling Tribal Traditions to assist Victims of Crime
Dallas GoldTooth (Dakota/Navajo Nation)
Facilitator/Producer, Reclaim the Fire
 
  Strength from within: Rekindling Tribal Traditions through Music
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida Nation)
Grammy Award Winning
Singer/Performer/Composer/Actress/Lecturer
 
     

Friday, December 7, 2012

 
8:30 − 10:00 am Workshops C  
Maureen White Eagle Introducing "Keeping Native Children Safe When Sexual Abuse Allegations Are Raised in a Custody Case"
Introducing a new resource developed by the Minnesota Indian Women’s Sexual Assault Coalition designed to help child protection workers, attorneys, judges, advocates, Guardian Ad Litems, Court Appointed Special Advocates, custody evaluators, and others working on cases involving intrafamily sexual abuse of Native children. The resource provides helpful Native-specific background information on incest, victims, perpetrators, co-occurrence of domestic violence and child sexual abuse, and treatment options and outlines the roles of professionals potentially involved in a custody case in which allegations of sexual abuse are raised. It is a comprehensive resource designed to quickly educate professionals on a difficult, complex topic. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
C1
Andreas
Raquelle Myers
John Evans
Stephanie Lucero
Debbie Weir
Delivering Services to Underserved Victim Groups Affected by Drunk and Drugged Driving
This workshop will include a discussion of two Office for Victims of Crime–funded projects: (1) the National Indian Justice Center’s Tribal Traffic Safety Justice Liaison Project, which addresses the needs of victims of drunk and impaired driving by developing a program that provides comprehensive training and technical assistance resources to tribal and nontribal justice system personnel to help them provide more effective and culturally competent services to American Indian and Alaska Native victims of alcohol-related motor vehicles crashes; and (2) Mothers Against Drunk Driving’s project to develop and facilitate specialized training institutes to increase competent service delivery to underserved victim groups affected by drunk and drugged driving nationwide. The second year of their initiative will include training institutes that focus on services to American Indian and Alaska Native populations as well as victims in rural areas. The program also includes the creation of strategic community outreach plans specific to the unique needs of each population. (PowerPoint) (PowerPoint)
C2
Chino
Art Martinez
Kathy Deserly
Masking the Traumatic Experiences: The Use of Psychotropic Medications in the Treatment of Ongoing Abuse and Trauma
(Sponsored by the Children's Bureau)
This workshop will focus on the issues of the effects of chronic medication use on victims of traumatic stress. Important in these issues is the dynamic utilizing drugs to mask the effects of traumatic response in children and adults. Many times medications are useful in the treatment of symptom reduction, allowing for cultural and psychological treatment efforts to take form in order to develop safety for the survivor. Far too often in the cases of domestic violence and childhood victimization the treatment of trauma responses through medications becomes a potentially lifelong treatment to a logical and short-term symptom of the abuse. This critical problem in the care of survivors has led to the use of psychotropic medications as chemical controls masking the wounded spirit within. The course will guide discussion around the Children’s Bureau and the NRC4Tribes’ efforts to assist tribes in addressing these very issues and in developing court protocols for the review and authorization of medications for child dependents of the tribe and children of Indian Child Welfare Act involvement. (PowerPoint)
C3
Pueblo
Sarah Reckess
Darrel Dowty
"The Right to Be Heard:" Enhancing the Role of Victims in Tribal Courts
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
Victim participation in criminal court proceedings can be viewed as both a "right" and a "rite" toward healing. This presentation will discuss how tribal courts can enhance the role of victims using victim testimony and impact statements, direct restitution to victims, diversion and healing circles, and community impact panels. (PowerPoint)
C4
Mohave Learning Center
Eileen Hudon
Sarah Deer
Trafficking in Indian Country: The Garden of Truth Report
This workshop will review the findings from the "Garden of Truth: Prostitution and Trafficking of Native Women in Minnesota" report. Native women are at a high risk for issues such as poverty, homelessness and sexual violence - all elements in the trafficking of women. This groundbreaking includes research as well as interviews of more than one hundred Native women in Minnesota. (Report)
C5
Catalina
Sarah Curtiss
Jeremy NeVilles-Sorell
Facilitation Tools: Listening to the Needs of Survivors and Articulating Their Safety Needs in the Community
Strong facilitation skills are needed when working to address violence against Native women. Conducting a sound intake by getting good information, facilitating a productive meeting based on discussion and decision making, educating the larger community on violence against women issues, and facilitating learning best occurs through dialogue and interaction. This training guides participants through the facilitation process and provides hands-on practice to evaluate and improve facilitation skills.
C6
Madera
Geneva Shaw
Porshca Cobbs
Genevieve Markussen
Springwind Roja
The Story of Abalone Woman and Dentalium
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
This video was developed by the Yurok people to bridge modern technology to teach traditional cultural practices and legends to address domestic violence and sexual assault in their community. This workshop will present the Yurok Tribe’s approach to unmasking domestic violence and sexual assault in its community by generating community readiness—engagement to dialogue about issues from the leadership level to the future leaders: the youth. Presenters will share videos that they developed to teach cultural practices and legends and provide insight on connecting with the strength within our cultural traditions as a way to heal. Presenters will share ways they have worked with youth, as agents for change, by training them as peer mentors. (PowerPoint)
C7
Pasadena
Kathryn England-Aytes Memories Hold Hands: Understanding the Effects of Historical Trauma and Unresolved Historical Grief in American Indian/Native Alaskan Communities
Confronting the devastating intergenerational effects of physical, emotional, social, and spiritual genocide must include an understanding of historical trauma, its impacts, and its modes of transmission across generations. Culturally competent interventions for Native children who have experienced trauma focus on contemporary trauma in the context of historical, cumulative, and collective experience. In order to more adequately address the pressing needs of Native children, we must incorporate the strengths and resiliencies gained from generations of survival and adaptation. It is clear that many indigenous communities have enhanced community ties to culture and tradition. Support of those families and communities is critical in preventing further reinforcement of historical trauma as a contemporary experience.
C8
Sierra
Lisa Thompson-Heth
Kasey Cadwell
In the Spirit of Justice—Engaging Our Tribal Communities and Youth
This workshop will focus on engaging tribal communities and youth on issues of domestic violence, teen dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Specific information on providing education and awareness will be shared on how to involve tribal communities and youth. We will discuss collaborating with other agencies to reach out to tribal communities and empowering youth to become healthy leaders and help in ending violence in our tribal communities.
C9
Ventura
Paula Julian
Chai Jindasurat
Meeting the Needs of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Two-Spirit, and Queer Survivors
This interactive workshop will educate participants on the multiple levels of discrimination a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Two-Spirit, and Queer (LGBTTQ) survivor of violence may experience in seeking services, provide promising practices for meeting the needs of LGBTTQ survivors, and identify resources for ongoing technical assistance support. (PowerPoint)
C 10
SmokeTree F
Dolores Subia BigFoot University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center Trauma-Informed Care: Reducing the Effects of Trauma Exposure in Indian Country
American Indian and Alaska Native children are at higher risk for trauma exposure and trauma-related sequelae (e.g., depression, suicide, substance use, and school dropout) than children of other cultural and ethnic groups. This presentation will provide information on trauma-informed practices as well as the various kinds of trauma exposure with this population. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the need for trauma-informed practices in service delivery to reduce the impact of retraumatization on American Indian and Alaska Native children and their families. Currently, there exist little or no rigorously evaluated treatments designed specifically for American Indian and Alaska Native children with trauma-related symptomatology. To address this need the Indian Country Child Trauma Center developed a cultural adaptation of evidence-based interventions. This presentation includes an overview of the cultural adaptations of one evidence-based intervention, an introduction of Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for American Indian/Alaska Native children. Honoring Children, Mending the Circle incorporates traditional American Indian and Alaska Native beliefs and practices about behavior, health, healing, humor, and children.
C11
SmokeTree D/E
Victoria Ybanez
Cinnamon Ronneng
Building Blocks for Safety and Justice: Sexual Assault Response Protocol Development
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs)
Developing protocols that guide the tribal sexual assault response is an important part of the safety net provided for victims by building seamless cooperative efforts across the multiple responding practitioners. Importantly, we want protocols to be responsive to the culturally specific needs of Native victims/survivors. This session will build participant understanding of what a protocol is and why it is important to have protocols in place. Presenters will discuss the different areas protocols can cover and will examine the steps involved when drafting protocols. Session participants will learn methods that can be used to incorporate the experiences of victims and ensure the protocol is victim centered and culturally specific. And, session participants will gain an understanding on how to design a plan of action and process for writing the protocols with their tribal Sexual Assault Response Team. (PowerPoint)
C12
SmokeTree A/B
Kelly Gaines Stoner
Shelley Miller
Working in Harmony to Leverage Resources
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
This workshop will explore the resources that local or semilocal law schools may have to offer to promote victim safety and perpetrator accountability. The presenters effectively collaborated to create a Native American Victim’s Rights Clinic and a Legal Assistance to Victims Clinic. The partners are located approximately an hour or more from each other. The presentation will cover the beginnings of the collaboration process to include conversations with tribal leaders and academic deans and move through the entire project, which has lasted more than ten years. (PowerPoint)
C13
Santa Rosa
10:00 − 10:30 am Break (break food fully funded by San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, federal funds limited to beverages only)  
10:30 − Noon Workshops D  
Eileen Hudon
Emma Geyer
Elders Breaking the Silence about Sexual Violence
The Elder’s Lodge in St. Paul, Minnesota, is creating a safe place to talk about sexual violence. We have initiated a community strategy for creating safety and breaking the silence surrounding sexual violence in Native communities. As a community gathering place, we represent more than four thousand family and community members extending into numerous community networks. (PowerPoint)
 D1
Andreas
Michelle Garcia
Rebecca Dreke
The Use of Technology to Stalk
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
Technology has become ubiquitous in today’s society. As such, it has become easier for stalkers to monitor, track, and harass their victims. This presentation will focus on how offenders use technology, including cell phones, computers, cameras, and global positioning systems to stalk. Safety measures and considerations for documentation will be discussed.
 D2
Chino
Roe Bubar Use of a Structured Protocol in Forensic Interviews of Child Victims in Tribal Communities
This workshop will present how the National Institute of Child Health and Development structured protocol can be adapted for forensic interviewing of children in sexual abuse cases in tribal communities. Results from research on children’s memory, communication skills, and social knowledge were used to develop the National Institute of Child Health and Development guidelines to successfully improve the quality of the child interview.
D3
Pueblo
Ruth Jewell Justice System Advocacy: Solutions and Culturally Based Justice for Native Victims of Abuse within the Jurisdictional Maze
When victims of abuse in Indian country face either tribal or state courts the issue of jurisdiction can be put before the safety of the victim. In this workshop we will explore some of the solutions and ways to overcome the barriers, whether obtaining protection orders or seeking justice that includes an opportunity for healing and, when appropriate, restorative justice to facilitate a cohesive and traditional family unit.
D4
Mohave Learning Center
Dianne Barker Harrold Compassion Fatigue and Stress Relief for Service Providers in Indian Country
This workshop will provide information for service providers to crime victims in Indian country and identify the differences between vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue; provide strategies for self-care and stress relief; and include interactive and fun exercises along with surveys to measure stress levels for individuals and supervisors of service providers.
D5
Catalina
Kelly Gaines Stoner
Anna Clough
Shelly Miller
Advocates under Subpoena
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
This workshop will combine lecture, PowerPoint presentations, and small group exercises for an interactive session addressing the differences between privileged records and confidential records in a tribal setting. The workshop will require participants to engage in activities that require them to determine whether a given tribal statute protects advocates records and, if not, what measures advocates can take to further enhance protection of client records thereby promoting safety and confidentiality for victims. (PowerPoint)
D6
Madera
Donna Horton Treating Complex and Historical Trauma with Native American Journeying and Soul Retrieval
This workshop will address traditional Native concepts of trauma, intergenerational trauma, and the use of journeying for healing and soul retrieval. It will include the opportunity for participants to take a traditional journey and process the journey using traditional concepts.
D7
Pasadena
Tania Harvey
Jarvis Quymyintewa
Working Together to Address Domestic Violence in Tribal Communities
The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation recognizes the need to protect and cherish its most valuable resource, its children: toddlers, youth, and teens. The circle that surrounds and protects these members include family, tribal members, tribal leaders, and individuals that are a part of tribal programs specializing in working to strengthen Fort McDowell families. The Domestic Violence Action Team of Fort McDowell educates and provides awareness of issues on domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and teen dating violence, and ensures that victims receive the services to protect them. The Domestic Violence Action Team utilizes community resources and events for prevention strategies such as articles in the tribal newsletter, vigils, community education, employee training, and family fun runs, to name a few. Several public service videos, short films, and skits have also been produced with scripts written and performed by youth, employees, and tribal members. Domestic Violence: A Cry for Help, the short film produced by the Domestic Violence Action Team, will be viewed. This workshop will help identify community resources, including its youth, and show how to create and use these strategies in tribal settings. It will also show how these tools assist in addressing how domestic violence affects children. (PowerPoint)
D8
Sierra
Pam Moore
John Sawney
The Art of Victim-Centered Safety Planning
The workshop will offer an overview of creating an individualized safety plan focused on the input and resources of domestic violence and sexual assault victims in rural and tribal communities. Discussion will also cover the concept of engaging community partners such as other agencies, law enforcement, and the courts to assist with safety issues for victims. Hands-on activity will be to conceptualize a plan for developing the safety net in their community. (PowerPoint) (HandOut) (HandOut) (HandOut) (HandOut)
D9
Ventura
Juli Ana Grant
Allison Turkel
Exercising Leverage: How the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act Was Used to Build Relationships, Improve Information Sharing and Enhance Community Safety in Indian Country
To build and sustain relationships can be challenging, especially when there may be controversial circumstances surrounding the perspectives of various partners. Changes in access to federal and other funding can also complicate the opportunities to work together. Now, more than ever, agencies must be innovative in their approaches to sustain programs and to use opportunities when building systems to collectively provide for the safety for justice officials, service providers, and community members as well as offenders. The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act was one such opportunity and tribal communities have used the minimum requirements of the Act to not only access information sharing systems and improve criminal justice response, but also to leverage resources for their victim advocacy efforts and to improve public education about sex offenses. This session will discuss those advancements and next steps to continuing to work on these important issues.
D10
SmokeTree F
Alisa Santucci
Robin Cenzial
Joe Walker
Engaging Native Men to Mend the Circle: Healing Trauma and Sharing Wisdom to Address Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
The purpose of this workshop is to discuss and explore promising practices and innovative strategies to engage Native men to become a stronger voice for promoting safety and stability for their families and communities in reducing domestic violence and sexual assault. The workshop will discuss the importance of acknowledging trauma experienced by Native men and how this impacts their ability to develop healthy relationships and engage in prevention efforts. Grassroots networking opportunities with Native men on the reservation, as well as within the community, will be discussed along with how to strengthen partnerships with agencies and providers. Additional available resources (National Resource Center and others) will be shared to promote father involvement, strengthened families, and healthy relationships. (PowerPoint)
D11
SmokeTree D/E
Bethany Case
Valaura Imus
Andrea Leoncavallo
Focus Group: Drug Endangered Children in Indian Country Video Resource
The purpose of this focus group is to preview and provide feedback on a developing Office for Victims of Crime resource—Drug Endangered Children in Indian Country Video and Resource Guide. The Office for Victims of Crime is seeking to develop a resource that is accurate, culturally appropriate, meaningful, and useful to Native Americans—community, family members, and professionals—who work toward restoring traditional, tribal, unified approaches to caring for Native children who have been endangered by drugs.
D12
SmokeTree A/B
Ronda Pokupec
Clarina Kee
Kyle Newman
The Power of Story: The Use of Story and Spirituality to End Domestic Violence, Child Sexual Abuse, and Child Neglect in the Native Community
Southcentral Foundation’s award winning Family Wellness Warriors Initiative, thoroughly grounded in Alaska Native traditional values and strengths, recognized internationally for its innovative approach, is ending domestic violence, child abuse and child neglect in Alaska. For every person who has been harmed there is a person who caused that harm. The reality of that is staggering when you consider Alaska ranks the highest in a variety of sexual and violent crimes. This workshop will demonstrate how helpers can come alongside both those who have been harmed and those who have caused harm in a way that offers hope and healing in conjunction with safety and boundaries. This workshop will also explore using the power of "story" as a means to identify the root cause of behaviors and discuss the importance of spirituality as a cultural resiliency factor, inseparable from traditional belief systems that played an important role in historical survival. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
D13
Santa Rosa
Noon − 1:30 pm Working Luncheon (fully funded by conference registration fees)

East Pool Deck
(Weather Permitting) 

  Emcee
Elton Naswood (Navajo), Capacity Building Specialist
National Native AIDS Prevention Center
 
  Invocation
Darryl Brown (Choctaw Nation)
Spiritual Leader
 
  Tribal Victim Advocacy Awards
Bonnie HeavyRunner Tribal Victim Advocacy Awards
Presented by Iris HeavyRunner PrettyPaint (Blackfeet/Crow)
Gertrude HeavyRunner (Blackfeet)
Aislinn HeavyRunner-Rioux (Blackfeet)
 
  Introduction of Featured Luncheon Speaker
Mary Lou Leary
Acting Assistant Attorney General
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Featured Luncheon Speaker
Justice Department Role in Promoting Tribal Strength from Within to Assist Victims of Crime
Tony West, Acting Associate Attorney General
U.S. Department of Justice (Speech)
 
  Strength from Within through Music
Cody Black Bird (Eastern Band Cherokee and Dakota) (invited)
American Indian Flutist and Traditional Singer
 
1:30 − 3:00 pm Workshops E  
Natalie Stites
Vikki Eagle Bear
Micah Lunderman
Okiciyapi: Working Together for Children Exposed to Violence on the Rosebud Reservation
Enforcement. Resilience. Protection. Empowerment. Overseen by a collaboration composed of thirty federal, state, tribal, and community agencies since October 2010, the Rosebud Defending Childhood Initiative addresses children’s exposure to violence. Implementing since February 2012, the Rosebud Defending Childhood Initiative provides victim’s advocacy, community outreach, and public awareness, serving twenty-six children and conducting sixty-eight presentations across the reservation. (PowerPoint)
E1
Andreas
Jane Root Best Practice for Responding to Disclosures of Domestic and Sexual Violence in the Health Care Setting
This workshop will briefly define domestic and sexual violence. Make the connection to health outcomes and demonstrate how health care providers can assess their patients in a culturally appropriate and caring manner. (PowerPoint)
E2
Chino
Hallie Bongar White
Monite Deer
Non-Indians Committing Crimes in Your Community: Imposing Meaningful Consequences and Deterrents through Civil Law and Traditional Mechanisms
This workshop will explore creative code provisions and civil remedies to impose meaningful, impactful consequences against non-Indian perpetrators of crime in Indian country. Participants will learn how to incorporate traditional responses to wrongdoers in mitigating the effects of non-Indian perpetrators as well as the outer limits of civil justice responses. (PowerPoint)
E3
Pueblo
Sarah Henry Full Faith and Credit in Indian Country
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
This workshop will provide information on the Violence Against Women Act’s Full Faith and Credit provision and how it applies to tribes and tribal protection orders. Discussion will focus on issuance and enforcement of different kinds of protection orders, covering challenges, best practices, and recent changes in the law. (PowerPoint)
E4
Mohave Learning Center
Kent Miller
Rebekah Jones
Cultural Alternatives to Contemporary Group Counseling for Crime Victims
This presentation will discuss the development of our Healing through Art program at the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation. It will explore the differences between our program and art therapy and how this program has been successful in assisting people in healing from the emotional traumas brought about from domestic and sexual abuse. (PowerPoint)
E5
Catalina
Paula Ciniero
Tia Holley
Brittany Luddington
Linda McLaughlin
Shirley Moses
Debbie Turner
A Partnership Effort in Village-Based Trainings on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
The purpose of this training is to describe how two agencies started a partnership to travel to remote villages in the interior of Alaska at the request of tribes to train community members and providers on domestic violence and sexual assault. (PowerPoint)
E6
Madera
Sarah Curtiss Using Our Sacred Voice to End Violence in Our Communities
Using traditional women’s songs, Sarah Curtiss, the coordinator of the Sacred Hoop Coalition, works with advocates and community members, teaching them songs and encouraging them to use the strength of their voices to speak against violence against women in their communities. Workshop attendees will learn how they can integrate traditional songs in community education.
E7
Pasadena
Dianne Barker Harrold
Bruce Bridges
Victim Information and Notification Everyday—VINE Systems in Indian Country
This workshop will provide information for service providers to crime victims in Indian country about the technology and benefits of victim notification systems.
E8
Sierra
Valaura Imus Screening for Domestic Violence in Social Services Arena
Assessing risk of domestic violence is required in some settings and should be included as a routine assessment of all women seeking care in the social service arena. This session will explore the concept of discussing domestic violence during intake procedures in social service agencies, how to introduce domestic violence concerns to victims during intake, and how to respond to victims.
E9
Ventura
Michelle Garcia
Rebecca Dreke
Building Collaborative Relationships to Respond to Stalking
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
Creating an effective coordinated community response is integral in helping victims of stalking. Using videos, interactive discussions, and examples from participants’ communities, this workshop will provide an overview to the crime of stalking and participants will learn how to create and implement a successful coordinated community response to stalking. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
E11
SmokeTree D/E
Chia Halpern
M. Brent Leonhard
Thomas Murphy
LeRoy Shingoitewa (invited)
Melissa Tatum
Tribal Law and Order Act: Implementing Enhanced Sentencing Provisions
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
This workshop will provide information to participants on the requirements for implementing the enhanced sentencing provisions of the Tribal Law and Order Act. Presenters include participants from tribes that have implemented the provisions. (PowerPoint) (PowerPoint) (PowerPoint)
E12
SmokeTree A/B
Gayle Thom
Lawrence (Lou) Robertson
When the Unthinkable Happens: Crisis Response in Native American and Alaskan Native Communities
(Sponsored by the Office for Victims of Crime and the Bureau of Indian Affairs)
Whether it is a missing child, violence at the workplace or school, a natural disaster, or another critical incident, managing the multiple and diverse needs of American Indian and Alaska Native communities in times of crisis is complex. Within the context of an enrolled tribal member, who is also a Bureau of Indian Affairs agent, and a retired Federal Bureau of Investigation victim specialist—both of whom have vast experience, the following questions to be addressed in this interactive workshop are far from simple. What is the quickest, yet most effective way to facilitate a coordinated crisis response to victim families in American Indian and Alaska Native communities? What will be required in terms of resources to improve safety and promote healing and justice for victims of crime? What is each discipline’s role in the response plan? How will you and your program or agency fit in? How will harmony be achieved with those that respond from other areas, informing them of local culture and spirituality during times of crisis? How do you assess your community’s risk of a crisis occurring? How will tribal leaders’ success be measured in their handling of the crisis?
E13
Santa Rosa
3:00 − 3:30 pm Break (break fully funded by Casey Family Programs, no federal funds utilized)  
3:30 − 5:00 pm Workshops F  
Anna Marjavi
Ethleen Iron Cloud-Two Dogs
Terri Yellowhammer
The Defending Childhood Initiative and Technical Assistance Approaches for Tribal Grantees
(Sponsored by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and the Defending Childhood Initiative)
The Defending Childhood Initiative engages six cities and two tribes and leverages existing resources across the Department of Justice to focus on preventing, addressing, and reducing childhood exposure to violence. Panelists will discuss the initiative and data on childhood exposure to violence, and offer strategies for effective technical assistance with tribal nations using culturally specific examples.
F1
Andreas
Paul Minehart
George McCauley
Tribally Driven Improvement of ICWA Performance in State Child Welfare Systems
The QUICWA Compliance Collaborative is a consortium of tribes, urban agencies, government departments and national advocacy groups. Collaborative members measure Indian Child Welfare Act performance in state child welfare systems and use this information to improve relationships between tribal and state child welfare systems. Ultimately, state systems’ responses to Indian children and families are improved resulting in better outcomes for children.
F2
Chino
Linda Bearcrane Couture
Gwen Adakai
Arlene Armijo
Lanisha Bell
Jennifer Cole-Robinson
Wendy Running Crane
Michelle Leyva
Kelly Meacham
Robyn Simmons
Victim Assistance Program, Office of Justice Services: Providing Hope, Healing, and Justice to Victims of Crime in Indian Country
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
Victim specialists shall provide information on their roles and how they collaborate with other agencies, provide real-life case scenarios, and describe the future goals of the Victim Assistance Program. Victim specialists will discuss providing direct services to victims in remote locations, discuss the challenges of providing adequate services in Indian country, and provide examples of difficult case work. Victim specialists shall provide case scenarios of their role with tribal courts, detentions, probation, hospitals, and other agencies to advocate for victims. Victim specialists shall provide information regarding what types of resources they utilize while they assist victims and what type of unique needs are addressed. Victim specialists shall discuss their role in the criminal justice system and how this impacts victims.
F3
Pueblo
Brian Hendrix
Suzanne Breedlove
Oklahoma’s State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison Initiative
The project, the only one of its type in the nation, is a demonstration program dedicated to improving communication among tribal, state, federal, and local officials in order to enhance victim assistance and outreach services to tribal communities in Oklahoma. The purpose of the project is to enhance victims’ compensation and assistance outreach to Oklahoma’s thirty-eight federally recognized tribes. This workshop will review Oklahoma’s unique history with the thirty-eight tribal governments that are now headquartered in the state, the historical trauma that the Native people survived, and the ongoing outreach efforts to each tribal community as described in the grant. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
F4
Mohave Learning Center
Melissa E. Riley Gathering Cultural and Contemporary Wisdoms for Victim Healing
This intermediate workshop is designed to assist helping professionals that are responsible for supporting tribal community members through counseling, education, child welfare, and advocacy. Culture and tradition is the foundation of tribal communities, and it is important for helping professionals to understand and help bridge wisdoms that support victim healing. (PowerPoint)
F5
Catalina
Matthew Dale
Joan Eliel
Winona Tanner
The Hope Card and Domestic Violence Fatality Review in Indian Country
(Sponsored by the Office on Violence Against Women)
Presenters showcase how collaboration among tribal, federal, and state entities can improve officer and victim safety and offender accountability by promoting justice through the Montana Hope Card project and the Montana Fatality Review Commission. (Report) (Video)
F6
Madera
John Sawney
Pam Moore
Applying Core Cultural Values to Victim Safety Issues
(Sponsored by the Bureau of Justice Assistance)
This workshop will help participants identify their tribe’s core cultural values, apply them to victim safety issues, and emphasize the importance of being accountable to those values. Core cultural values build trust in leadership, provide better service to the people, increase employee satisfaction, and change the work environment. (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
F7
Pasadena
Carol Russo Collaborative Problem Solving and Conflict Resolution between Tribal, Local, and State Governments and Community Members
(Sponsored by Department of Justice (DOJ) Community Relations Service)
The Community Relations Service will present a workshop in which the services that it provides for tribal governments and tribal communities faced with conflict surrounding racial, national origin, or other protected bases (e.g., color, sex, sexual orientation, religion, disability, and gender identity) are discussed. The Community Relations Service provides conciliation and mediation services and works with communities to resolve conflict in a peaceful manner. Information on work that the Community Relations Service has done in tribal communities on behalf of tribal leaders and members in settings ranging from allegations of discrimination in tribal/border town conflicts, nontribal school settings, and tribal/nontribal law enforcement conflicts will be provided. There will be a short interactive session with attendees to introduce the art of conciliation and facilitation and conflict-resolution skills so that attendees will be able to experience firsthand the skills utilized in community participatory dialogue. Attendees will also have the opportunity to discuss any conflicts that might exist in their tribal communities to determine if the Community Relations Service might be able to offer services to reduce tension and conflict. (PowerPoint)
F8
Sierra
Jennifer Pierce-Weeks
Kim Day
Promoting Safety, Justice, and Healing by Recognizing and Responding to Brain-Injured Intimate Partner Violence Victims
According to the Brain Injury Association of America, brain injury is unpredictable in its consequences. Brain injury affects who we are and the way we think, act, and feel. It can change everything about us in a matter of seconds. It is important to recognize brain injury as a possible consequence in intimate partner violence cases and to recognize the health implications associated with intimate partner violence. No two brain injuries are exactly alike. Both the brain and its associated injuries are complex. The effects of a brain injury depend on factors such as cause, location, and severity. In this workshop, participants will begin to understand the anatomy as well as the function of specific lobes and sides of the brain, as well as the signs and symptoms of specific injury sites; identify when medical intervention is necessary; and learn how knowledge of these issues can improve outcomes in court. (PowerPoint)
F9
Ventura
Diane Benson Living Beyond the Wounds: Recovery and Cultural Tools for Emotional Survival
This workshop presents ways to keep from dropping into the darkness, whether you are a provider or a survivor of sexual assault or violence. We will provide some techniques for survival and understanding of the role that culture can play in your own esteem. Expect to express! (PowerPoint) (HandOut)
F11
SmokeTree D/E
Chris Holloway
Ryan Morse
Eugenia Tyner-Dawson
Demystifying the Federal Budget Formulation and Grants Process: "Show Me the Money"
This workshop will be based on creating a better understanding of the Office of Management and Budget – Budget Formulation Process across the government and over several years, with different fiscal year budgets under formulation at various stages (2013, 2014, 2015). The presenters will describe at what stage budgets can be discussed with the public and when information is embargoed (internal to the federal government). The presenters will also explain the Crime Victims fund administered by the Office for Victims of Crime. The workshop will also describe the FY 2013 President’s Request for the Office of Justice Programs (For example: What does the 7% mean and where does it come from?) How are salaries, training and technical assistance resources budgeted? What percentage of funds is expended for grants to tribes?) (HandOut) (HandOut)
F12
SmokeTree A/B
Elsie Boudreau
Linda McLaughlin
Silent No More: Honoring, Listening, and Responding to Survivor Voices of Those Who Have Been Sexually Abused/Assaulted in Indian Country
The power of the film The Silence lies in its honest and intimate accounting of a history of sexual abuse in a small Yup’ik village in Alaska at the hands of Catholic clergy. This presentation will allow for a discussion, using the film as a tool, focused around healing. (Film)
F13
Santa Rosa
5:00 − 7:00 pm Wiping of Tears Ceremony (optional)
Jim Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
Pasadena
     

Saturday, December 8, 2012

 
9:00 − Noon Closing Plenary Session
 
 California Ballroom
  Emcees
Sarah Deer (Mvskoke), Assistant Professor
William Mitchell School of Law
Bonnie Clairmont (Ho-Chunk), Tribal Victim Advocacy Specialist
Tribal Law and Policy Institute
 
  Honoring Victim/Survivor Voices
Honoring/Traveling Song
The Boyz
 
  Short Video Excerpts:  
  Closing Chair Ceremony Honoring Victims/Survivors of Violence
Jim Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
  Role of the Indian Law and Order Commission
in Promoting Tribal Strength from Within to Assist Victims of Crime

Carole Goldberg, Commissioner, Indian Law and Order Commission (PowerPoint)
 
  BREAK (break fully funded by Casey Family Programs, no federal funds utilized)  
  Cultural Resilience: Finding Hope from the Inside Out
Dr. Iris HeavyRunner PrettyPaint (Blackfeet/Crow)
Training & Technical Assistance Director
and Native Aspirations Project Director
Kauffman & Associates, Inc. (PowerPoint)
 
  Closing Comments
James Cantrall, Deputy Director
Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Closing Remarks
Mary Lou Leary
Acting Assistant Attorney General
U.S. Department of Justice
 
  Honoring Victim/Survivor Voices
Honoring/Traveling Song
The Boyz
 
  Closing Invocation
Jim Clairmont (Sicangu Lakota)
Spiritual Leader
 
     
     
     
     
Č
Ċ
Lou Sgroi,
Sep 3, 2013, 5:40 PM
Ċ
Lou Sgroi,
Nov 22, 2012, 9:51 AM